CuNap timber treatment gaining traction

In Issue32 by FIEA1 Comment

IWT-Moldrup, a 3rd generation company who design and supply processes andequipment for timber treatment, including industrial wood modification, are now supplying the worldwide first dedicated Cu-Nap plant as an environmentally friendly but effective future alternative to CCA and creosote.

Copper naphthenate (CuNap), has been used for many years in the United States andrepresents a well-tested and well-documented alternative to both CCA and creosote and animprovement over newer Copper Organics. IWT-Moldrup will supply the first dedicated CuNap plant worldwide for an American producer of wooden bridges in a few months (hansenbridge.com).

Stina Cecilie Moldrup, marketing manager, explains: “The timber to be treated is used forbridge construction where wood durability is of utmost importance for road safety as wellas an excellent environmental profile is required since many bridges pass over water-ways.We expect to see a surge in use of Cu-Nap for heavy construction use such as bridges,foundations for housing, and pilings”.

”Cu-Nap is also a more cost-effective alternative to using modified timber like IWT-Moldrup’s own unique sustainable resin treatment concept biobiowood. The Cu-Nap preservative is to be made available from several preservative suppliers world-wide. The first exclusively designed plant in the US has been developed by IWT-Moldrup, in this case, in close cooperation with one of the markets chemical suppliers, Nisus Corporation, who is now the leading manufacturer of Cu-Nap in America”.

Mr.Moldrup, a more than 49 year veteran in the business, explains: “The treatment is a hotprocess contrary to cold processes using other copper-based products. Cu-Nap is not just asimple mixture of copper with naphthenate in an oil. It is a complex formula, and usingsimple acid-ingredients is not an option, if the durability is to be assured.”

Source: IWT-Moldrup

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Trevor
Trevor
1 December 2020 9:35 pm

Nothing here about end of life disposal or recycling. Can the preservatives be recovered safely & easily via (say) pyrolysis?